They’re Here: Spotted Lanternflies Hatching

Last summer I considered myself lucky. I had been spared the experience of living inside a swarm of the latest (and possibly greatest) pest problem to fly into my region of Pennsylvania. I found something this week, however, that proved my luck has ended. The lanternfly is here.

(image obtained from https://extension.psu.edu/how-you-can-comply-with-the-spotted-lanternfly-quarantine-regulations)

Beyond being a significant public nuisance, the Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is likely to ruin agricultural orchards, grapes, and some lumber products wherever it lives and feeds. If you haven’t already heard about the problem, familiarize yourself now, because we must come together to battle this enemy.

Here are two key resources:

The authorities have taken this threat very seriously, and they are reaching out to the public for help. For instance, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture is looking for contractors to bid on the work of removing tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima). The tree, like the lanternfly, is considered an invasive species and has long been an enemy of our healthy, native ecosystem. However, research has now connected the tree to the sustained survival of the lanternfly. Destroy the Ailanthus and you reduce the lanternfly population.

Additionally, PA’s Dept. of Ag posted its latest Order of Quarantine and Treatment, which can be found by jumping to Page 28 (i.e. 3094) at this link: PA Bulletin of May 26, 2018. It essentially states that it is the responsibility of every property owner in the region to help control the lanternfly.

Since the adult pests die off over the winter, last season’s initiative was to find and destroy the egg masses. I looked but didn’t find any. Sadly, I hadn’t looked close enough. About a week ago, a tiny insect clinging to a pruned branch in my backyard caught my eye. Having seen many photographs of the nymph-stage lanternfly, I immediately knew what it was. I tried to crush it, but it hopped free with the quickness of a flea. Suspecting that nymphs don’t move far, I vigilantly searched the area again. Within a few days, I found two nymphs hanging on the side of my shed. Then three. Then four. I was getting closer, perfecting my swatting technique to a 90% kill rate as I went.

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

I returned to inspect and slap the shed numerous times over the next few days. Then one morning, I found a congregation of about 29 nymphs clinging to the bottom of one of the shed’s wooden shingles. There was the egg mass, hidden cleverly from view.

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph
Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

I have killed about 100 lanternfly nymphs and removed three egg masses over the last five days. Some nymphs were found on the nearby woodpile, which represents thousands of hiding places. I’ve come to realize there are two ways of looking at the matter. One is to feel hopeless about the obvious fact that I’ve removed only 100 drops from a bucket that is about to overflow. Add this to the numerous other bug battles to contend with, such as the Emerald Ash Borer and the disease-carrying ticks. The other way is to be motivated by the fact that I am certain there will be 100 fewer of the buggers come summer. Add this to the work of the many dedicated individuals who are tirelessly seeking a solution as well as the everyday people like me who are multiplying my meager efforts.

Thus, I am sounding the alarm: the nymphs are hatching! PLEASE take the time to educate yourself about the lanternfly, including identification at all stages and methods for eradication, mechanical and chemical.

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph
Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

Same shot as above from a greater distance to show how tiny these creatures are.

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

The diameter of this log is less than two inches.

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph
Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

The visibility of the white dots depends on the nymph stage (1 to 4). At nymph stage 5, the black begins to turn red.

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