Behind the Wheel

We all want a good life. Yet, for many of us, our desire for happiness and satisfaction is met with anger and frustration. After a short errand this morning–a four-mile drive during rush hour–I wondered how good it would be if we all got out of our cars.

Americans drive constantly. It’s not just the ridiculous daily hours spent sitting in commuter traffic, it’s engrained into everything we want or have to do. Expose your kids to extracurricular activities? Gotta’ drive ’em. Get food for the week? Gotta’ drive. Catch a ballgame? You don’t just gotta’ drive; you have to cut out in the seventh inning so that you can beat the traffic home. Want to go out for a few drinks? Gotta’ designate someone to drive. Go on vacation? Getting there involves the longest drive of the year, a dread-filled fact that haunts your entire holiday, because if you want to get home, you gotta’ drive it again.

Rolling past one scenic view after another during a vacation to Colorado.

Public transportation, while good for many reasons, isn’t much better. It still involves a lot of time that could otherwise be spent on better things.

Whenever I get to feeling low about our culture, I try to imagine what it was like back in the days when we had REAL problems. Typhoid fever. Abusive masters. And a general need to labor over every task. We tackled them through time, especially the general laboring part. Work was replaced by machines, just as walking has been replaced by cars. Now we’ve taken the matter so far that, instead of weaning us off our vehicular addiction, we’re investing in the creation of smarter cars. No amount of technology will fix the fact that we need to stop this constant migration.

Life is really good for people like me. I have the tools to deal with the majority of hardships that come my way, and even when I don’t, help is at hand. Still, it’s in my nature to want things to be better, and in that vein, I prefer labor (walking) to stress (driving). Meanwhile walking–or even biking–simply isn’t an option around here; the infrastructure just isn’t in place. But I can still dream and hope for a trend that brings us back to community, to neighborhoods, to villages, to being happy with the amenities nearby, and to be able to spend the majority of my days without getting in the damn car.

How some spent a beautiful Sunday in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania

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