A Path to Health and Connection

Do you wish you could get more exercise? Do you wish you had more time to yourself? Do you wish you could escape once in a while?

There is a phenomenon in American culture: we don’t do the things we know we need to. No matter how much we understand the value of exercise and stress reduction, we push aside the activities required to achieve our goals, as if these were luxuries we haven’t yet earned.

“I cannot take time for myself; my family needs me,” the tired mother says.

“I cannot afford the equipment I need to start an exercise program,” the busy employee says.

“Somehow the day’s end comes before I manage to take that walk,” the blog writer says.

Guilty as charged. Productivity. Health. Focus. Happiness. Success. I know I can gain all five with one act, yet day-after-day I don’t do what I need to do. And all I need to do is go for a walk.

Thus, I have made a commitment in order to break this cycle of failure. I have woven together a plan, and I hope you’ll come along with me.

Loyal readers already know that I’ve had a new project on the horizon. I hinted at it when I sent out an exclusive readership survey invitation last season. Fifteen percent responded (thank you!), and a synergy was found in what was written. Here is a summary:

• Of all the subjects listed, no one liked gym best in school.
• No two respondents share the same profession.
• 80% want to be outside.
• While only one person gets to be outside for his or her job, the majority is satisfied with number of hours they work.
• Everyone has reasons to care about the environment.
• No one believes the earth’s climate is remaining the same.
• Most people check the weather every day but not more than once.
• Birds and water ranked highest among people’s favorite outdoor-related things.
• We live in a variety of environments (urban, rural, etc.)
• Most of us began using a home computer after the age of twenty, and most still prefer to read digital content on a computer or laptop, none of us via a phone.

As for what was liked and disliked about this blog, the answers were all over the map. “Too long,” “a bit preachy,” “not enough graphics,” and “not enough solutions” were negatives offset by “very succinct,” “love the kindness,” “informative,” and “clean design.” Of course, I’ve taken it all into account, both negative and positive. Each comment is a thread in my woven plan.

And so, here it is:

Today's Walk

www.TodaysWalkOutside.com

This is a new blog that is set to launch in the next few days. Walk with me each day, in all kinds of weather, down a variety of paths, and through a world that offers an unlimited supply of prompts to get me thinking about my role in it.

Each post is short and falls into one of four categories: facts (nature-related knowledge), events (cyclical or unusual), observations (life-related metaphors) and tips (instruction, gear, advice).

This does not mean Back to Basics will end. The frequency may change to every-other-week, but the writing will remain the same. I cherish you loyal readers of the Back to Basics blog, many of whom have been here every week since it began in 2008. With fewer than 300 people on the mailing list, 60 of whom I know read every post within 24 hours of its release, I am honored to continue to share my thoughts with you.

Meanwhile, in order to continue to write, in order to stay healthy both physically and financially, I need to expand. And here’s where I need your help. Today’s Walk must reach an audience that is 100 times greater than Back to Basics. This is for a variety of reasons, most of which centers on satisfying the wants of the publishing industry. I am actively seeking an agent in a very competitive marketplace, and nothing peaks the publishing world’s interest more than a large reader following. In short, Today’s Walk has to be big.

The first post will be ready soon. After the release, if you like what you see, please tell a friend. Please continue to offer feedback, privately or via the comments. Please continue to care about the natural world so that together we can inspire more people to walk down the path that connects us all to better health.