Latest Comments

In response to: The Case of the Missing Bat

Comment from: [Member]
rosalisa

You have educated me once again. Thank you for your enlightening, succinct, and thought provoking topics.

10/30/17 @ 18:18

In response to: The Case of the Missing Bat

Comment from: [Member]

Karen and Joy: I'm glad that I was able to sway your opinions of the bat, even if just a little.

And Joy, admittedly, my first reaction to a bat in the bedroom would very likely be to hide under a pillow.

:)

10/30/17 @ 17:48

In response to: The Case of the Missing Bat

Comment from: Joy Connell [Visitor]
Joy Connell
4 stars

You did it again; got my attention and just maybe sympthetic awareness on a subject - 'I rather not go there'!
Haloween seems appropriate for these little fellows since they are definitely scary (to most of us) Yes ignorance is bliss and don't know what to say about "old wives tales". But once we see the LIGHT it is hard to hide under a pillow - so please keep doing what your doing.
Enlightenment feels good........Joy

10/30/17 @ 10:16

In response to: The Case of the Missing Bat

Comment from: Karen [Visitor]
Karen

Hi Ruth - excellent article - and I just thought they were ugly and liked to nose dive kids at dusk (which happened all summer in my back yard when I was young!) I had no idea the good they do the environment

10/30/17 @ 08:55

In response to: The Ruins of Ego

Comment from: [Member]

Sven:

First, please accept my sincere apologies for the very late reply to your post. I had a bit of a glitch and was not receiving proper notification.

Second, thank you for the quote (and comment). That about sums it up.

Last, yes, recite that statement whenever you feel the weight of things today is too much to handle!

Sincerely,

Ruth

10/02/17 @ 11:25

In response to: The Ruins of Ego

Comment from: Sven [Visitor]
Sven
5 stars

This is really profound and beautiful on many levels. I so relate to the modesty part and while it seems counterintuitive that that's Ego acting out, it feels 100% true. I'm reminded of Charles Bukowski's somewhat harsh but resonating quote: 'The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence.'

Perhaps simply daring to recite that statement with full conviction is a first step to healing?

09/22/17 @ 01:50

In response to: Standing inside what could be.

Comment from: Mike M [Visitor]
Mike M
5 stars

Great article Ruth!!! I LOVE this line...

"the seeds and roots and flesh of the victims endlessly transferred to the lives of the future"

As one who loves nature and also as a woodworker, I have a vast appreciation for our forests, Creating things out of wood gives me a hands on connection to the trees who's bounty I now repurpose.

06/10/17 @ 11:00

In response to: Standing inside what could be.

Comment from: [Member]

Thank you, Steve. I often think of you when we travel, wishing we would take more of those talked-about camping trips together with you. In the meantime, your feedback is greatly appreciated.

06/10/17 @ 10:28

In response to: Standing inside what could be.

Comment from: Steve [Visitor]
Steve
5 stars

Nice column, I always like your insight into the surrounding world.

06/10/17 @ 07:49

In response to: Cracks in the Sidewalk

Comment from: [Member]

Janet, Elly, Joy, and Judy: I truly appreciate your encouragement, and I'm glad to hear this was well received. It wasn't easy to write. I'm not wanting to offend, but neither am I wanting to continue to keep quiet.

It's comforting to know you feel the same. We're all in this together. :)

04/03/17 @ 10:46

In response to: Cracks in the Sidewalk

Comment from: Judy [Visitor]
Judy
5 stars

"I cannot understand you until I’ve truly been you, and I cannot be anything other than who I am." That has always summed it up for me. Thanks for writing this, you've outdone yourself yet again! I label myself as human and really, that's all that should matter. It also doesn't make me any better than a non-human, just a different species.

03/29/17 @ 13:23

In response to: Cracks in the Sidewalk

Comment from: Joy Connell [Visitor]
Joy Connell
5 stars

Lots and lots of good material in this dissertation! Yes; and I think you could go on and on - why not?Why not turn this into a book? We all need to ponder these uprisings more deliberately, to understand each persons position. We do need to take a stand from time to time regarding things harmful to our happiness and very existence. We are all human but individual just the same!
Personally; my life's agenda was to becoming something; something others would recognize and appreciate. It took forever to understand that being myself was all I needed to be successful. In fact it is our differences that make us essential to the whole once acceptance is uncovered.
Oh I wish there was a way for everyone to be happy and come together in acceptance - I wish that loving my neighbor was a reality and that contentment wasn't such a lonely place. I know this though; there is Harmony underneath the cracks in the sidewalk and Truth is the Key........

03/23/17 @ 18:36

In response to: Cracks in the Sidewalk

Comment from: [Member]
elly_sadorf
5 stars

Ruth,
With all the political junk out there today, I was feeling saturated. This writing is a breath of fresh air - it contains common sense and shows a desire to just live and let live. We all need to stop labeling and judging others. This was the best thing I have read in years!!

03/23/17 @ 09:51

In response to: Cracks in the Sidewalk

Comment from: Janet [Visitor]
Janet
5 stars

Right on, Ruth. Excellent article....what is the old saying...Judge not lest you be judged". Biblical or not, all humans desire respect and fair treatment even though each was created as an individual. Be kind and carry on!!

03/22/17 @ 18:04

In response to: Whatever happened to compassion?

Comment from: Joy Connell [Visitor]
Joy Connell
5 stars

Not sure you'll receive this.....you got it right but it's heartbreaking to think people are so swept away by glitz and glitter that they've forgotten how to feel. We have become desperate in an attempt to keep up and keep going we've totally
lost direction.
The election was and still is a circus. I recall on interview, only one, when asked about being presidential DT replied; "Oh; I can be presidential you just wait and see! What did that mean was he so busy acting like a clown because we are all
perceived as idiots? Why couldn't he act 'presidential' all along? What does it mean?
For me this stage of existence is essential to figure out the meaning of life. How do we treat our neighbors? Why do they matter? If one of us is hurting it affects us all. Compassion for each other keeps it real. For in the worst of us there is a something that reflects the best of us. We are all essential to the whole. It is a beautiful world that abounds in ugliness at times. I choose to see the beauty and respect the space I'm given. But what do I know?

12/24/16 @ 08:56

In response to: Whatever happened to compassion?

Comment from: Sven [Visitor]
Sven
5 stars

Well said, Ruth. DT is certainly a reflection of the worst of American culture — the selfishness, bombast, superficial consumerism, lack of self reflection and humility. So in many ways it was just a matter of time until the supersized mirror of our own shadow was held right into our face with this man who represents Ego in its most pure and unfiltered form.

Obviously, Americans also have the capacity to be compassionate, thoughtful and kind. And it’s not even that some people are 100% caring and others 100% selfish, it’s just that in the binary choice of a presidential election where both candidates usually embody various degrees of the moral and emotional landscape, this time one of the choices offered no such landscape and enough people had their primal caveman instinct triggered enough (through clever manipulation, I should add) to vote for this guy.

The good news is that the majority actually went for the candidate which I think more accurately describes us as a country: flawed and complicated, but ultimately with a good heart and intentions. So there’s a very valid moral argument to be made that this was just a temporary flirtation, an error of judgment from which we can learn if we keep focusing on the better angels of our nature and make sure that those are better represented and fought for, not just in presidential elections but in local races across the country.

The bad news is that the damage from this slip of epic proportions will turn out to be so consequential that we will not be able to overcome them. I’m thinking about nuclear conflict or climate change, which are so final in their implications as to render any kind of legislative or cultural squabbling pointless. But we have no choice but to hope to avert the big irreversible disasters and work to make sure we can recover from the smaller ignorance-based disasters that will surely come to pass (figuratively and literally) in the coming months and years.

12/23/16 @ 14:38

In response to: Fission or fussion? A look at the science of social change.

Comment from: [Member]

Yet another regular user was unable to comment. I'm still tweaking the settings and have made bold changes this time. Further adjustments may be necessary to control Spam attacks, but for now, comments should be working without incidence. Again, do email me if you cannot comment. Until then, here is another post that was emailed to me:

"I really would love to return to early settlement of our country where people gathered together in quest for the good of their own little communities. Basic characteristics of mankind are similar but each one is designed individually as to compliment the whole. (I think) Not unlike all that thrives in order to sustain life as we know it.

"Last night on the news a reporter inquired of the tree farmer; "How long will these cut trees survive?" The farmer indicated that while it was partly in the species of the tree, it also had to do with conditions of the environment surrounding it. However; he emphasized; "There are no two tree exactly alike - each one is individual. So it is with us the keeper and protectors of our world. And as you pointed out our differences tend to make us great when properly united.

"The other day while walking Murphy I did what I usually do. I study the trees and ground growth while MM is sniffing. Now that they are mostly baron I noticed how tall some of the trees are and all the wonderful geometric shapes in growth. It was sunny and bright that day so my attention scaled to the shadows laying on the ground.

"And this is what I concluded: "Knowledge is not unlike a shadow - it is a glimpse of understanding what we see and feel. The world keeps turning and rearranging the patterns of our thoughts.

"NOTHING is absolute! Thus the need for change becomes eminent....

I hope we all find Peace, Hope, ,and Good Reason in the New Year."

11/21/16 @ 09:17

In response to: Fission or fussion? A look at the science of social change.

Comment from: [Member]

I received this comment via email. The author notified me that he was unsuccessful in posting it here. Please do let me know via ruth @ thewritebeat . com if you too have trouble posting a comment. Until then, here is his post:

"If a 'nation' is divided against itself, that 'nation' cannot stand.... I take poetic license in that. I believe most Americans just stand in line in the 'cattle chute' and begrudgingly file towards the inevitable outcome that has been predetermined for them by 'The System.' A system which they don't really understand, an inherently corrupt system that has been tainted by pass down ethics and legacy legislators striving to survive beyond their expiration date. We endeavor to change things... but change is REALLY hard and being apathetic beings in general, we take the path of least resistance. If we as Americans (The American Nation) intend to survive and, YES, move forward to a common good, we must look back on the lessons that I was taught as a young child (I am just south of 60 years old)... that is to respect one and another and EARN what you want out of life... nothing in life is free! Ignorance is not bliss, but is the catalyst for decay of our society."

11/17/16 @ 08:19

In response to: A Massive Ceremony Coming to Philadelphia

Comment from: joy connell [Visitor]
joy connell

It was the unimaginable loss of our precious grandson that indelibly impressed upon me the importance of family. We are all tied together but famililes have a special bond. There is unbarable pain in the death of any child especially when brought about from a society gone wrong. We need to work to change that wrong. (I know this is personal)
Pope Francis was here to promote unity and the Catholic Church. That family image within the church excludes the range of vision we as a society have adopted. The Pope represents one religious impression of the family. Make no mistake; it is not all inclusive! Families in our country constitue diverse ideals and groups that come together based on relative belief systems. We are free to explore and choose.
The Pope positively brightened our vision with his presence and message of hope for several days. We cheered about the humility in caring for the homeless and honoring the helpless. A person so GREAT stepping off the chariot for a while in recognition of those less fortunate. The speaches so brilliantly thought out touched the hearts and minds of the masses. Much of which the significance was a reflection of all the original ideals of this GREAT country.
Now that the hoopla has subsided what have we that is lasting? Agreeably we need to treat our neighbors with love and respect as was the call. But tolerence needs to be foremost since we are a people who hold dear free choice and freedom to discover our personal destiny.
Change is necessary but it must be based on a broader vision. So lets get serious about leadership and taking part when we can - getting involed where we can to make 'our country' our pride.
So much to digest in the context of the article; thank you as always for your dedication and imput Ruth......

10/01/15 @ 08:01

In response to: The Elements of Ceremony

Comment from: [Member]

Joy:

There are many reasons why the average American (like me) has been "pushed against a wall." One of those reasons, I believe, is the preaching we are subjected to, especially by those with an intention to manipulate.

I appreciate your recognition of the bravery it takes to speak out. It's difficult to start this conversation without the support of those who understand its purpose. It's not about promoting spiritual enlightenment, although that could be a goal of the individual. It's about the journey, one that's easier to embark upon when kind people nudge us along.

Ruth

09/16/15 @ 08:39